Sunday, January 20, 2013

Todd Burge and William Shakespeare: The Musical!

READ ABOUT TODD'S NEW SHAKESPEARE MUSICAL BELOW
But first check out the latest Burge CD.


CASTING FOR LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST ONGOING!
Music by Todd Burge. Lyrics by William Shakespeare adapted by Geoffrey Coward
(c)2013 Bunj Jam Music BMI

Come one, come all for auditions to a modern re-imagining of William Shakespeare's Loves's Labour's Lost! Presented by the MOVP, (Marietta Ohio) sponsored by The Colony Theatre and Zane Laser, this is a chance to be a part of what is sure to be the very first production of its kind. Using a condensed script of Shakespeare's original play reworked by Geoff Coward, this version of LLL will be set in Appalachia, and will be featuring original music and songs composed by Todd Burge. It is certain to be a one-of-a-kind theatre experience from both the stage, and the audience.
There are a few roles for MALES yet to be cast.  Looking for males ages 20-early 40s
Please contact tb@toddburge.com

Download comes with complete lyrics.  




Love’s Labour’s Lost – The Complete Lyrics

Music by Todd Burge
Lyrics by William Shakespeare
adapted by Director Geoffrey Coward
(c)2013 Bunj Jam Music BMI

Shakespeare's Loves's Labour's Lost! Will be presented May 2013 by the MOVP, (Marietta Ohio) sponsored by The Colony Theatre and Zane Laser, this is a chance to be a part of what is sure to be the very first production of its kind. Using a condensed script of Shakespeare's original play reworked by Geoff Coward, this version of LLL will be set in Appalachia, and will be featuring original music and songs composed by Todd Burge. It is certain to be a one-of-a-kind theatre experience from both the stage, and the audience.

1) THE OATH
The Oath starts the whole play and can be a sort of signature tune.  Story telling song – we can have the whole company sing or just one story-teller singer

(various) Once upon a time in the State of Navarre
 King Ferdinand proclaimed from afar

(FERDINAND) No women shall come within a mile of my court
As she’ll lose her tongue if I receive such report
(such a report)
Such a report
The king will have her tongue
If he receives such a report.

Once upon a time in the State of Navarre
 King Ferdinand proclaimed from afar

All men must swear to these three laws
Or suffer public shame of their character flaws
No talking to women for the next three years
But study and study with likeminded peers
Likeminded peers (Study study)
Likeminded peers (Study study)
Just study and study with likeminded peers

Once upon a time in the State of Navarre
 King Ferdinand proclaimed from afar

One day in the week to touch no food
With one meal a day to establish the mood
Three hours of sleep is expected at night
and closed eyes by day will not be in sight
Not in sight (closed eyes)
Not in sight (keep em wide open)
Only three hours of sleep will be expected at night

Once upon a time in the State of Navarre
 King Ferdinand proclaimed from afar

2) THE MOTH
Moth the adolescent servant/attendant to Don Adriano.  Moth is attractive and very quick witted (much more so than his master).  In this song he has been asked to define the differences in women’s complexions.


If she be made of white and red,
Her faults will ne'er be known,
For blushing cheeks by faults are bred
And fears by pale white shown:
Then if she fear, or be to blame,
By this you shall not know,
Always her cheeks possess the same
Naturally she doth owe.

3) Adrano De Armando's Love Song


Note from Director Geoff Coward: Adriano de Armado is a Don Quixote figure of fun to all those around him. He has a high opinion of himself (Shakespeare calls him Amado as England had just defeated the Spanish Armada) and is very colorful in his language and in his dress.  Here we learn that he has fallen in love with the local “whore” Jaquenetta, and cannot control his feelings.  In the song he makes comparison with Sampson, Hercules and believes that there is no contest with the weapons he has (foil, passado, duello are all sword-like weapons: we can also introduce some sexual imagery here).

(Chorus)
I do love the ground she treads.
Guided by her foot within her shoe.
I’d break my oath, be proved untrue
Suggesting love be falsely named
‘Less possessed by devils untamed

Yet Samson with great strength, and
Solomon, reputed wise, were both seduced.
As was Hercules’ club too soft for Cupid’s arrow
Therefore too great an odds for Armado’s foil
Producing practice true and loyal
(Chorus)

The first, passado, Cupid shows no respect,
Regard for duello does not exist.
His glory Is, to subdue men to love .
So Adieu
Valour, rapier rust, help me from above
Devise, wit; write pen; for I am in
love
(Chorus)


4) The "Who Are You" Song

Director's Note:  The four guys are trying to get information from Boyet about the four girls they are interested in.  Boyet is the chaperone to the girls

DUMAIN
Sir, I pray you, a word: what lady is that same?
BOYET
The heir of Alencon, Katharine her name.
DUMAIN
Thank you sir for the word, a gallant lady
Monsieur, farewell
BOYET
Indeed this is she young sir
And to you I fare the well too
You I fare thee well
(Both sing during Dumain exit)
Da doo da doo da doo da doo
Da doo da doo da doo da doo

LONGAVILLE
I beseech you a word: what is she in the white?
BOYET
A woman sometimes, if you saw her in the light.
LONGAVILLE
Perchance light in the light. I desire her name.
BOYET
She hath but one for herself; to desire that were a shame.
To desire that were a shame.
Da doo da doo da doo da doo da doo

LONGAVILLE
Pray you, sir, whose daughter?
BOYET
Her mother's, I have heard.
Her mother's, I have heard
LONGAVILLE
I think, sir, you are absurd
BOYET
Good sir, be not offended.
She is an heir of Falconbridge.
LONGAVILLE
Nay, my anger is ended.
But for the heir of Falconbridge.
She’s the sweetest of Falconbridge.
(Both sing during Longaville’s exit)
Da doo da doo da doo da doo
Da doo da doo da doo da doo
BERONE
What's her name in the cap?
BOYET
It’s Rosealine, Rosaline, by good hap.
BERONE
Is she wedded or no?
BOYET
To her will, sir, or so.
(Music Stops Cold)
(Spoken without music)
BERONE
You are welcome, sir: adieu.
BOYET
Farewell to me, sir, and welcome to you.

(Both sing during Barone’s exit)
Da doo da doo da doo da doo
Da doo da doo da doo da doo

(continuation of music under dialog)
MARIA
That last is Berowne, the merry madcap lord:
Not a word with him but a jest.
BOYET
And every jest but a word.
PRINCESS
It was well done of you to take him at his word.
BOYET
If my observation, which very seldom lies,
About the heart's silent rhetoric disclosed with eyes,
Deceive me not now, Navarre is infected.
PRINCESS
With what?
BOYET
With that which we lovers entitle being in love.
PRINCESS
Your reason?
 BOYET
His heart, like an agate, with your image impressed,
His tongue, all impatient to speak and not see,
Did stumble with haste in his eyesight to be.
All senses to that sense did make their repair,
To feel only looking on fairest of fair:

Methought all his senses were lock'd in his eye,
As jewels in crystal for some prince to buy;
Who, tend’ring their own worth from where they were glass'd,
Did point you to buy them, along as you pass'd.

His face's own margin did quote such amazes
That all eyes saw his eyes enchanted with gazes.
I'll give you Aquitaine and all that is his,
If you give him for my sake but one loving kiss.

PRINCESS
Come to our pavilion: Boyet is demented.
BOYET
Only speak that in words which his eye hath
disclosed.
I only have made a mouth of his eye,
By adding a tongue which I know will not lie.
(keep music under dialog and sequin into Scene 3)

5) The Fox,The Ape and the Humble-Bee


Director Geoffrey Coward's Notes:
This song is based on a piece of witticism between Adriano, Moth and Costard where De Amardo mistakes Costard’s injured shin for something more profound. A sheer piece of “nothing” that needs to be light and jolly and mischievous.

ADRIANO DE ARMADO
The fox, the ape, and the humble-bee,
Were still at odds, being but three.
That’s the moral, to this story
Now more details please-----------------------
More details if you please
More details if you please

MOTH
I will add the details. Say the moral again (spoken).

ADRIANO DE ARMADO
The fox, the ape, and the humble-bee,
Were still at odds, being but three.
That’s the moral, to this story
Now more details please-----------------------
More details if you please
More details if you please

MOTH
Until the goose came out of door,
And staying the odds by adding (B#7)four.
Now will I begin your moral, and you follow with postscript (spoken)
The fox, the ape, and the humble-bee,
Were still at odds, being but three

ADRIANO DE ARMADO
Until the goose came out of door
Until the goose came out of door
question
A good postcript, ending in the goose: would you desire more? (spoken by both?)

COSTARD
The boy sold him a bargain, a goose, that's flat.
Sir, your pennyworth is good, and your goose is fat.
A bargain sold well is as fast as its loose:
Let me see; a fat details; ay, that's a fat fat goose.
Ay, that's a fat fat goose.
ADRIANO DE ARMADO
Come hither, come hither. How did this argument begin?

MOTH
By saying that a costard had broken a shin.
Then call'd you for the details. (spoken)

COSTARD
True, and I for a salve: thus your argument appeared;
Then the boy's fat details, the goose was acquired;
the goose was acquired;

ADRIANO DE ARMADO
But tell us; how did Costard break his shin? (shouted)

MOTH
I will tell you sensibly sirs.(spoken)

COSTARD
Thou hast no feeling of it, Moth: let me speak: (spoken)
I Costard, running out, that was safely within,
Fell over the threshold and broke my shin.
(ALL SING)
That’s the moral, That’s the story
That’s the moral, That’s the story
That’s the moral, That’s the story
The fox, the ape, and the humble-bee,
The fox, the ape, and the humble-bee,
The fox, the ape, and the humble-bee,

6) The Princess's Hunting Song


Note from the director, Geoffrey Coward:
The Princess is about to go hunting (deer) with the Mountaineer. This is a ballad sung to the audience. Almost apologizing for what she is about to do. Maybe somewhat  melancholy.

So saving reputation in the shoot:
Not wounding, pity would not let me do't;
If wounding, then it was to show my skill,
That more for praise than purpose meant to kill (it)

And out of question so it is sometimes,
Glory grows guilty of detested crimes,

Chorus
Now mercy goes to kill, goes to kill
Now mercy goes to kill, goes to kill
Mercy goes to kill, goes to kill
And shooting well is then accounted ill.

When, for fame's sake, for praise, an outward part,
We bend to that the working of the heart;
As I for praise alone now seek to spill
The poor deer's blood, that my heart means no ill.

And out of question so it is sometimes,
Glory grows guilty of detested crimes,

Chorus

7) The Genitalia Chorus

Director's Notes by Geoff Coward: Boyet is asking Rosaline “ who is the shooter” from whom she has just received a letter. This line with sexual connotation creates the basis for the next very risqué piece of dialog that has been turned into a song.   They have recently returned from deer hunting

BOYET
Who is the archer? who is the hitter?
ROSALINE
Why she’s the one that bears the bow
BOYET
My lady goes to kill horns
ROSALINE
Then I am the shooter you know
BOYET
And who is your dear?
ROSALINE
If we chose by the horns
Your self come not near
Thou canst not hit it,
Canst not hit it, my good man
BOYET
An I cannot, cannot, cannot,
Cannot, another can.
(Exeunt ROSALINE and KATHARINE)
COSTARD
By my troth, most pleasant: how both did fit it!    
MARIA
A well shot target,
for they both did hit it.
BOYET
 Target, says my lady!
The target has a prick in it.     
MARIA
Wide of the target on the left hand!
i' faith, your hand is out.
COSTARD
Shoot, shoot  nearer,
or  he'll miss the clout.
BOYET
An if my hand be out,
then belike your hand is in.
COSTARD
Then will she get the best shot
by cleaving the pin.
MARIA
Come, come, you talk greasily;
 your lips grow foul.
COSTARD
She's too hard for you at pricks, sir:
challenge her to bowls.
BOYET
I fear too much rubbing.
Good night Good night, my good owl.
I fear too much rubbing.
Good night Good night, my good owl.
My good owl
(Exeunt BOYET and MARIA and Costard running)

8) Epitaph on the Death of a Deer


Holfernes is a wind-bag with a classical education and a high opinion of himself; hence nobody knows what he is talking about (including many Shakespeare scholars).  At the onset of this song he has been observing the deer hunting and proceeds to give an epitaph on the death of the deer.  A big, expansive comic song for Holfernes to receive congratulations and adulations from those on stage at its conclusion.

HOLOFERNES
Spoken
Making use of alliteration, for it confirms fluency.

The preyful princess pierced and prick'd
a pretty pleasing pricket;
Some say a sore; but not a sore, till now made
sore with shooting.
The dogs did bark say yes to sore, when sorrel jumps
from thicket; OR
whatever deer it was; the people fa-fa-fa-fall
a-hooting.

The dear is wounded dearly,
Then L too sore makes fifty

Adding another L
And that makes another hundred quickly.

Break
Repeat

9) Berowne's Love Letter


This song is sung by Nathaniel, a country parson, and Holfernes, the local school teacher.  The song is a private letter which they have just opened, written by Berowne to Rosaline.  The love letter’s verses are Berowne’s but sung by Nathaniel and Holfernes.

SIR NATHANIEL (reads and sings)
If love make me forsworn, how shall I swear to love?
Ah, never faith could hold, if not to beauty vow'd!
Though to myself forsworn, to thee I'll faithful prove:
Those thoughts to me were oaks, to thee like willows bow'd.

SIR NATHANIEL AND HOLFERNES.
Celestial as thou art, O, pardon, love, this wrong,
That sings heaven's praise with such an earthly tongue.

HOLFERNES
Study his bias leaves and makes his book thine eyes,
Where all those pleasures live that art would comprehend:
If knowledge be the mark, to know thee shall suffice;
Well learned is that tongue that well can thee commend,

SIR NATHANIEL AND HOLFERNES.
Celestial as thou art, O, pardon, love, this wrong,
That sings heaven's praise with such an earthly tongue.

SIR NATHANIEL
All ignorant that soul that sees thee without wonder;
For which is owed some praise that I thy parts admire:
Thy eye Jove's lightning bears, thy voice his dreadful thunder,
Which not to anger bent, is music and sweet fire.

SIR NATHANIEL AND HOLFERNES.
Celestial as thou art, O, pardon, love, this wrong,
That sings heaven's praise with such an earthly tongue.
Celestial as thou art, O, pardon, love, this wrong,

10) Love's Soldiers


Love’s Soldiers is sung by the 4 young men (Berowne, Ferdinand, Dumaine and Longaville after they have discovered that each of them as fallen in love.  Three of them ask Berowne to find a way where they can keep their oath to study and at the same time n fraternize with women.  Berown’e argument in the song is that it is women ‘eyes that provide the mechanism for learning and therefore being in love is not against the oath that they have sworn.  This song needs to be strong and vigorous with Berowne singing some as solo. This song ends the 1st half of the play.

Todd’s Notes:  A “talking blues” style influenced by the Byrds a bit too.  It could be taken slower to get the rhythm of the words down.  G, C, D, D7 & G7

Berowne
Love’s soldiers your oath, so tame
To fast, to study, and to see no dame;
Flat treason 'gainst the kingly state of youth.
So now you ask me to scorn such proof?
Your stomachs are too young to fast;
And illness with abstinence comes fast.

In that each of you have forsworn his book,
Can you still dream and pore and thereon look?
Would you, my lords find study's quick pace
Without the beauty of a woman's face?
From women’s eyes this doctrine I obtain;
They are the books, the learning to keep us sane.

(Berowne, Ferdinand, Dumaine, Longaville)
Now, for not looking on a woman's face.
We’ve forsworn our eyes to race
And study too, the reason for our oath;  
And *what author in the world, I quote,
(*the word “the” has been put in by mistak TB)
Teaches such beauty as a woman's eye? 
And where we are our learning likewise cries.


Berowne
O, we’ve made a vow to study, lords,
And in that vow we’ve forsworn our books.
For when would you, or you, or you,
In leaden contemplation have found out?
Such fiery numbers as the prompting eyes
Of beauty's tutors have enrich you with?
But love, first learned in a lady's eyes,
Lives not alone immured in the brain;
But, with the motion of all essentials
Courses as swift as thought in every force,
And gives to every force a double force,
It adds a precious seeing to the eye;

(Berowne, Ferdinand, Dumaine, Longaville)
From women's eyes this doctrine we derive:
They sparkle still the right Promethean fire;
They’re the books, arts, and academes,
And contain and nourish all our needs
Let us once lose our oaths to find ourselves,
Or else we lose ourselves to keep our oaths
Or else we lose ourselves to keep our oaths
Or else we lose ourselves to keep our oaths.

11) The "Nine Worthies" Song


This song is performed by the De Armando, Moth, and Holfernes, with a little help from Dull and Nathanial as they plan the entertainment they want to perform before the “Gentry” later that evening.  Conversational and ballad-like: quirky and amusing

HOLOFERNES
Joshua, yourself; myself Judas Maccabaeus
This gallant gentleman Hector;
The well-endowed swain be Pompey the Great;
The page, Hercules, to roar
ADRIANO DE ARMADO
Pardon, sir; he’s no bigger than Hercules thumb
He is not as big as the end of his willie.
HOLOFERNES
He shall present Hercules as a kid, by gum:
Entering, strangling a snake, quite rheum
MOTH
So, if any of the audience boo, you make pains,
 'Well done, Hercules! The snake you have slain
 That way the offence is made cordial
Though few have grace to see it as jovial
ADRIANO DE ARMADO
So who’ll play David, Alexander, Julius Caesar
Arthur, Godfrey, Charlemagne, and all the other geezers
HOLOFERNES
Myself will play three of them one at time
MOTH
Thrice-worthy gentleman: what’s there to rhyme
ADRIANO DE ARMADO
I beseech thee follow we must plan the event
Success with this will be heaven sent.

HOLOFERNES
 Dull! thou hast spoken no word with all this stir
DULL
No surprise at all I understood neither a word.
HOLOFERNES
Allons! we will employ thee so come thou along
DULL
I'll make up a dance, or so; or I’ll play
On the tabor to the Worthies as they dance in the hay.
HOLOFERNES
Most dull, honest Dull! To our sport, away! (Exeunt)

12) Meeting in Disguise


The guys are in disguise (Mountain Men) trying to impress the gal they love.  The gals know of the disguise and have double tricked the guys by wearing a mask and wearing “the favor” that one of their counterparts received; meaning that the guys are addressing the wrong girl.  (Ferdinand thinks he is addressing Princess, Berowne addressing Rosalind, etc  Boyet is acting as “messenger” between each pair.

FERDINAND
Say to her, we’ve measured many many miles
To tread a measure with her on this grass.
BOYET
They say, that they have measured many a mile
To dance two-step with you on this grass
To dance two-step with you on this grass
ROSALINE
It is not so. Ask them how many inches
Is in one mile: if they have two-stepped many,
The two-step then of one is easily told.
BOYET
How many inches doth fill up one mile.
How many inches doth fill up one mile
BEROWNE
Tell her, we two-step them by weary steps
BOYET
She hears herself,  she hears herself
ROSALINE
How many weary steps, how many weary steps
Are number'd in the travel of one mile?
Are number'd in the travel of one mile?

BEROWNE
We number nothing that we spend for you:.
Vouchsafe to see the sunshine of your face,
That we, like savages, may worship it.
ROSALINE
My face is but a moon, and clouded too.
My face is but a moon, and clouded too
FERDINAND
Blessed are masks, to do as such clouds do!
Vouchsafe, bright moon, and these {thy} stars, to shine,
Those masks removed, removed removed,
upon our eager eager eyes.
upon our eager eager eyes.

ROSALINE
O vain petitioner! beg a greater matter;
Thou now request’s but moonshine in the water.
FERDINAND
Then, in our measure do but vouchsafe one change.
Thou bid'st me beg: this begging is not strange.
Thou bid'st me beg: this begging is not strange
ROSALINE
Music plays, then! Nay, you must do it soon.
Not yet! no dance! Thus change I like the moon.
FERDINAND
Will you not dance? How come you thus estranged?
ROSALINE
You took the moon at full, but now she's changed.
You took the moon at full, but now she's changed.

FERDINAND
Yet still she is the moon, and I the man.
The music plays; demand some motion to it.
ROSALINE
Our ears demand it.
FERDINAND
But your legs should do it.
ROSALINE
Since you are strangers and come here by chance,
We'll not be shy: take hands. We will not dance.
FERDINAND
Why take we hands, then?
ROSALINE
Only to part friends:
Curtsy, sweet hearts; and so the dancing ends.
Curtsy, sweet hearts; and so the dancing ends.
FERDINAND
More pleasure of this dance; be not nice.
ROSALINE
We can afford no more at such a price.
FERDINAND
Prize you yourselves: what buys your company?
ROSALINE
Your absence only.
FERDINAND
That can never be.
ROSALINE
Your absence only.
FERDINAND
That can never be.

ROSALINE
Then cannot we be bought: and so, adieu;
Twice to your visor, and half once to you
FERDINAND
If you deny to dance, let's hold more chat.
ROSALINE
In private, then.
FERDINAND
I am best pleased with that.
ROSALINE
In private, then.
FERDINAND
I am best pleased with that.   (they move aside)
(Berowne and Princess take over)
BEROWNE
White-handed mistress, one sweet word with thee.
PRINCESS
Honey, and milk, and sugar; there is three.

BEROWNE
Nay then, two threes, and if you grow so nice,
Sweet mead, beer  and red wine: well run, dice!
There's half-a-dozen words, I need not say it twice

{Guitar break}

PRINCESS
Seventh word, adieu:
Since you can cheat, I'll play no more with you.
BEROWNE
One word in secret.
PRINCESS
Let it not be sweet.
BEROWNE
Thou hits a sore spot.
Therefore fitting.  (they move aside)
(Dumain and Maria take over)
DUMAIN
Will you talk with me to exchange a word?
MARIA
Name the word.
DUMAIN
Fair lady……..
MARIA
Say you so? Fair lord,--
Take that for your fair lady.
DUMAIN
If it pleases you,
As much in private, and I'll bid adieu
As much in private, and I'll bid adieu. (they move aside)

Part two of Meeting
(Lomgaville and Katherine take over)
KATHARINE
What, was your mouth made without a tongue?
LONGAVILLE
I know the reason, lady, why you ask.
KATHARINE
O for your reason! quickly, sir; I long.
LONGAVILLE
You have a double tongue within your mask,
And would afford my speechless mouth a half.
One word in private with you, ere I die.
KATHARINE
Bleat softly then; the lady hears you cry. (they move aside)
BOYET  (to audience)
The tongues of mocking wenches are as keen
As is the razor's edge invisible,
Cutting a smaller hair than may be seen,
Above the sense of sense; so sensible
From their conversation; their conceits have wings
Fleeter than arrows, bullets, wind, thought, swifter things.
ROSALINE
Not one word more, my maids; break off, break off.
BEROWNE
By heaven, all dry-beaten with pure scoff!
FERDINAND
Farewell, mad wenches; you simple wits makes tears
PRINCESS
Twenty adieus, Twenty Adieus my frozen, frozen Mountaineers
(Exeunt FERDINAND, Lords)

13) The Owl and the Cuckoo


This is the final song and marks the end of the play; the mood is fairly somber as the guys and girls are not going to get together until a period of 3 years has passed.  The Princess has to return home as she has just heard that her father has died. The guys are given 3 years to do “philanthropic” work to prove their love of the girls.  The “worthies” (Holfernes, Nathanial, Dull, De Armodo, Moth, Jaquenetta, and Dull) perform the song.

When daisies pied and violets blue
And lady-smocks all silver-white
And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue
Do paint the meadows with delight,

The cuckoo then, on every tree,
Mocks married men; for thus sings he, Cuckoo;
O word of fear,
Unpleasing to a married ear!

When shepherds pipe on oaten straws
And merry larks are ploughmen's clocks,
When turtles tread, and rooks, and daws,
And maidens bleach their summer smocks.

Chorus
The cuckoo then, on every tree,
Mocks married men; for thus sings he, Cuckoo;
Cuckoo, cuckoo: O word of fear,
Unpleasing to a married ear!

WINTER.
When icicles hang by the wall
And Dick the shepherd blows his nail
And Tom bears logs into the hall
And milk comes frozen home in pail,
When blood is nipp'd and ways be foul,
Then nightly sings the staring owl, Tu-whit;
Tu-who, a merry note,
While greasy Joan doth keel the pot.
When all aloud the wind doth blow
And coughing drowns the parson's saw
And birds sit brooding in the snow
And Marian's nose looks red and raw,
When roasted crabs hiss in the bowl.

Chorus
Then nightly sings the staring owl, Tu-whit;
Tu-who, a merry note,
While greasy Joan doth keel the pot.


From Love's Labour's Lost (The Musical)
Music by Todd Burge. Lyrics by William Shakespeare adapted by Geoff Coward
(c)2013 Bunj Jam Music BMI


Still Auditioning men ages 20 to early 40s
email tb@toddburge.com 
www.toddburge.com


1 comment:

Todd Burge said...

Music by Todd Burge. Lyrics by William Shakespeare adapted by Geoff Coward
(c)2013 Bunj Jam Music BMI
Lyrics below.

Come one, come all for auditions to a modern re-imagining of William Shakespeare's Loves's Labour's Lost! Presented by the MOVP, (Marietta Ohio) sponsored by The Colony Theatre and Zane Laser, this is a chance to be a part of what is sure to be the very first production of its kind. Using a condensed script of Shakespeare's original play reworked by Geoff Coward, this version of LLL will be set in Appalachia, and will be featuring original music and songs composed by Todd Burge. It is certain to be a one-of-a-kind theatre experience from both the stage, and the audience.

This show has many roles available, both male and female, ranging in age from 20-80. There is even a part for a male 12-15.

Exact audition dates are January 27th at 7pm, and again on January 28th, also at 7pm.
Details are here
www.facebook.com/events/214967108640607/?fref=ts

5. This song is based on a piece of witticism between Adriano, Moth and Costard where De Amardo mistakes Costard’s injured shin for something more profound. A sheer piece of “nothing” that needs to be light and jolly and mischievous.

The Fox, the Ape, and the Humble-bee
Music by Todd Burge. Lyrics by William Shakespeare adapted by Geoff Coward
(c)2013 Bunj Jam Music BMI

For multiple voices. Todd Burge of course sings them all on this demo.

ADRIANO DE ARMADO
The fox, the ape, and the humble-bee,
Were still at odds, being but three.
That’s the moral, to this story
Now more details please-----------------------
More details if you please
More details if you please
MOTH
I will add the details. Say the moral again (spoken).
ADRIANO DE ARMADO
The fox, the ape, and the humble-bee,
Were still at odds, being but three.
That’s the moral, to this story
Now more details please-----------------------
More details if you please
More details if you please
MOTH
Until the goose came out of door,
And staying the odds by adding (B#7)four.
(B#7)Now will I begin your moral, and you follow with postscript (spoken)
The fox, the ape, and the humble-bee,
Were still at odds, being but three-------E--------
ADRIANO DE ARMADO
Until the goose came out of door
Until the goose came out of door
question
A good postcript, ending in the goose: would you desire more? (spoken by both?)
COSTARD
The boy sold him a bargain, a goose, that's flat.
Sir, your pennyworth is good, and your goose is fat.
A bargain sold well is as fast as its loose:
Let me see; a fat details; ay, that's a fat fat goose.
Ay, that's a fat fat goose.

ADRIANO DE ARMADO
Come hither, come hither. How did this argument begin?
MOTH
By saying that a costard had broken a shin.
Then call'd you for the details. (spoken)
COSTARD
True, and I for a salve: thus your argument appeared;
Then the boy's fat details, the goose was acquired;
the goose was acquired;
ADRIANO DE ARMADO
But tell us; how did Costard break his shin? (shouted)
MOTH
I will tell you sensibly sirs.(spoken)
COSTARD
Thou hast no feeling of it, Moth: let me speak: (spoken)
I Costard, running out, that was safely within,
Fell over the threshold and broke my shin.

(ALL SING)
That’s the moral, That’s the story
That’s the moral, That’s the story
That’s the moral, That’s the story
The fox, the ape, and the humble-bee,
The fox, the ape, and the humble-bee,
The fox, the ape, and the humble-bee,

Again,
Exact audition dates are January 27th at 7pm, and again on January 28th, also at 7pm.
Details are here
www.facebook.com/events/214967108640607/?fref=ts
www.toddburge.com